In 1988 I was asked to submit a piece for a new TV series - The Ruth Rendell Mysteries. Script in hand I drove to my weekend retreat in Somerset and started to read and get the feel for the story, characters and Chief Inspector Wexford…

Brian Bennett…

In 1988 I was asked to submit a piece for a new TV series—The Ruth Rendell Mysteries. Script in hand I drove to my weekend retreat in Somerset and started to read and get the feel for the story, characters and Chief Inspector Wexford.

Now sometimes a theme comes fast and sometimes you think it will never come. I put some logs on the fire and read - the theme came fast. I wrote it down and drove back to London late Sunday evening. Monday we recorded it. Tuesday it was in the post and Thursday morning Neil Zeiger, the producer, called me: “Can you come down to Southampton? - We like your music”.

Friday I drove to TVS Studios in Southampton. I met Neil in the editing suite, and watched a rough cut of the very first episode. We discussed the music and the characters in the series - then had lunch with the first of many directors I would be working with over the next four years. I’d got the job.

Neil Zeiger…

I have spent many happy years in Honeyhill Studios listening to Brian Bennett’s ingenious musical scores. Always a source of gratification, the day spent mixing down the music and listening to picture, represents the penultimate and most satisfying stage of the production process.

Music heightens the tension, accentuates the mood, helps twist and turn the emotions. The most ordinary of moments can take on meaning when assisted by a cleverly scored piece of music. And Brian’s music is always cleverly scored, always evocative, always fitting, and it always enhances the drama. Perhaps, most importantly, his original scores for the Ruth Rendell Mysteries make for excellent listening.

…Also

Music for the first Wexford, Wolf to the Slaughter, was composed by Marc Wilkinson. Richard Blackford composed the music for The Veiled One.